Battle of Britain Hurricane Control Arm Bolt

Battle of Britain , Control Arm Bolt

Battle of Britain Hurricane Control Arm Bolt

£65.00

In stock
0 out of 5

£65.00

Battle of Britain , Control Arm Bolt

Availability: In stock
View cart

Description

Battle of Britain Hurricane Control Arm Bolt

Control arm bolt from a Battle of Britain Hurricane P2815, No 229, Northolt.

Flying officer Malcolm Ravenhill. 27 years old .

After surviving being shot down on the 11th September, he was shot down and killed on Monday 30th September 1940 at 4-05pm.

Shot down by BF109 crashed and burned out at Church Road Ightham , and is buried in City Road Cemetery Sheffield.

Came with a typed piece of paper.

Battle of Britain Hurricane Control Arm Bolt

The Battle of Britain, also known as the Air Battle for England (Germandie Luftschlacht um England), was a military campaign of the Second World War, in which the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) of the Royal Navy defended the United Kingdom (UK) against large-scale attacks by Nazi Germany‘s air force, the Luftwaffe. It has been described as the first major military campaign fought entirely by air forces.[15] The British officially recognise the battle’s duration as being from 10 July until 31 October 1940, which overlaps the period of large-scale night attacks known as the Blitz, that lasted from 7 September 1940 to 11 May 1941.[16] German historians do not accept this subdivision and regard the battle as a single campaign lasting from July 1940 to May 1941, including the Blitz.[17]

The primary objective of the German forces was to compel Britain to agree to a negotiated peace settlement. In July 1940, the air and sea blockade began, with the Luftwaffe mainly targeting coastal-shipping convoys, as well as ports and shipping centres such as Portsmouth. On 1 August, the Luftwaffe was directed to achieve air superiority over the RAF, with the aim of incapacitating RAF Fighter Command12 days later, it shifted the attacks to RAF airfields and infrastructure.[18] As the battle progressed, the Luftwaffe also targeted factories involved in aircraft production and strategic infrastructure. Eventually, it employed terror bombing on areas of political significance and on civilians.

New Item Alerts

Receive an email when new items are added

Invalid email address
Give it a try. You can unsubscribe at any time.